The Latest

Oct 20, 2014 / 52,776 notes

(via bellaricanx3)

rosegoldundertone:

Esperanza Spalding
Oct 20, 2014 / 340 notes

rosegoldundertone:

Esperanza Spalding

(via tesahrey)

Oct 20, 2014 / 168 notes

pensiveczar:

Don’t say it…he said it!

(via blackourstory)

Oct 20, 2014 / 2,645 notes
profkew:

A proposed statue for the National Liberty Memorial, honoring the African American soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War, sculpted by artist David Newton of Dallas. (Michael Curtis)
Memorial for black Revolutionary War soldiers finds spot on Mall after 30 years

Maurice Barboza’s idea to build a memorial to black Revolutionary War soldiers on the Mall was sparked by the end of another struggle: the campaign by Barboza’s aunt to be the second black member of the Daughters of the American Revolution in modern times. She won.
That was 1984. Over the next 30 years, Barboza, inspired by his aunt’s tenacity, patiently shepherded the idea of a “black Patriots memorial” through the stages of historical research, development of a monument and then congressional legislation. The longtime Alexandria resident even sold his house to raise money and focus on the project.
And now, he may have won.
Last month, Congress unanimously authorized a site for the memorial: the northeast corner of 14th Street and Independence Avenue, a main gateway to the city, in what is currently a surface parking lot next to the Department of Agriculture. And on Sept. 26, President Obama signed the authorization into law. The National Liberty Memorial was formally approved for placement on the Mall.
“It’s been a long struggle,” Barboza said. “Each step of the way was met with resistance. I’m just so gratified that so many people have bought into this, and it’s given me a great deal of peace to move forward and create a great memorial.”
Barboza’s mission is to raise awareness about the role of African Americans in the Revolutionary War. At least 5,000 black soldiers, and possibly as many as 10,000, fought for independence from the British. Some were free and many were slaves, Barboza said, some enticed with false promises of their own freedom.
Read more.

ht @learothawms
 
Oct 20, 2014 / 98 notes

profkew:

A proposed statue for the National Liberty Memorial, honoring the African American soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War, sculpted by artist David Newton of Dallas. (Michael Curtis)

Memorial for black Revolutionary War soldiers finds spot on Mall after 30 years

Maurice Barboza’s idea to build a memorial to black Revolutionary War soldiers on the Mall was sparked by the end of another struggle: the campaign by Barboza’s aunt to be the second black member of the Daughters of the American Revolution in modern times. She won.

That was 1984. Over the next 30 years, Barboza, inspired by his aunt’s tenacity, patiently shepherded the idea of a “black Patriots memorial” through the stages of historical research, development of a monument and then congressional legislation. The longtime Alexandria resident even sold his house to raise money and focus on the project.

And now, he may have won.

Last month, Congress unanimously authorized a site for the memorial: the northeast corner of 14th Street and Independence Avenue, a main gateway to the city, in what is currently a surface parking lot next to the Department of Agriculture. And on Sept. 26, President Obama signed the authorization into law. The National Liberty Memorial was formally approved for placement on the Mall.

“It’s been a long struggle,” Barboza said. “Each step of the way was met with resistance. I’m just so gratified that so many people have bought into this, and it’s given me a great deal of peace to move forward and create a great memorial.”

Barboza’s mission is to raise awareness about the role of African Americans in the Revolutionary War. At least 5,000 black soldiers, and possibly as many as 10,000, fought for independence from the British. Some were free and many were slaves, Barboza said, some enticed with false promises of their own freedom.

Read more.

ht 

 

(via blackourstory)

Oct 20, 2014 / 5,818 notes

themodernisis:

jessicreep:

It’s a fucking shame the artists’ names aren’t added.

I’m obsessed with afro-futurism

(via afrodesiacworldwide)

Oct 20, 2014 / 1,375 notes

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Arthur Frederick Bridgman(1847-1928) - The ceremony of the Acharya in Blida in Algeria, oil on canvas, 118,5 x 162 cm. 

(via allbeautifulblackgirls)

back-then:

Portrait of a lady 1960
Oct 20, 2014 / 168 notes

back-then:

Portrait of a lady
1960

(via allbeautifulblackgirls)

Preferring to date a race isn’t racist! It’s like preferring a certain hair color or height

racists

Let me break this down:

- Race is a social construct invented by Western Europeans to justify chattel slavery. Preferences aren’t biological or something you are born with, because race didn’t even exist until about 500 years ago.


-  Among PoC, there is no race/ethnic group/country where all the people have anything in common besides being from a certain part of the world. Among PoC, there is no race where every member has the same skin color, hair color, hair type, eye color, language, clothing, culture, etc. 

- The only race whose members all have something in common is white- all white people have to have light skin in order to be white. This rule was created by white people themselves, and is intentionally exclusive.

- Don’t even pretend that you don’t know there is a racial hierarchy in beauty. Everyone knows that in Western culture white women are seen as the most desirable, black women are seen as the least desirable, and everyone else is in the middle. Funny how these “innate” and “random” preferences seem to line up perfectly with white beauty standards/white supremacist ideals.


- No more false equivalencies. PoC not wanting to date white people is not the same as the reverse. PoC almost never believe that white people are unattractive/ugly, they just find it too difficult to meet a white person who is actively unlearning and working to dismantle white supremacy. 

- Stop trying to defend yourself. If you have racial or ethnic preferences, whether they are positive or negative, you are the problem, stop blaming it on everyone else. You have to acknowledge and unlearn whatever stereotype you’ve absorbed. 

Like a previous post I made, this post is also not a place to try to debate whether racial preferences are bad or not. I’ve made my statement based on pretty obvious facts about Western culture and white supremacy. If you don’t agree, move on.
However, feel free to share your experiences with this (either involving you or someone else).

(via wocrecovery)

I see y’all

(via kinkyblackgirl)

(via allbeautifulblackgirls)

Oct 20, 2014 / 19,605 notes
Oct 20, 2014 / 494 notes

santiagocaruso:

"Nibiru, throne of Marduk" by Santiago Caruso / Tempera over paper / 42 cm x 31 cm

(via tesahrey)